Friday, July 31, 2020

President's Message - August 2020

August 1, 2020

 First and foremost, I hope you are safe and well, riding out the storm of the pandemic as best as you can. With a lot of free time on our hands these past few months, the members of the Board of Directors of the Palm Beach County Human Rights Council have been undertaking on several new initiatives, which we are pleased to report.

PBCHRC VOTERS ALLIANCE 

 Since 1988, the Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance (PBCHRCVA) has interviewed close to 1,000 candidates for public office, made endorsements in hundreds of races, registered thousands of new voters, and made sure LGBTQ and allied residents have voted. As a result, LGBTQ people have been elected to office in Boynton Beach, Cloud Lake, Haverhill, Lake Park, Lake Worth Beach, Lantana, Manalapan, Pahokee, Palm Beach Shores, Riviera Beach and West Palm Beach. Palm Beach County is unique in Florida, as close to one-third of Palm Beach County's municipalities have elected LGBTQ mayors, commissioners and council members since PBCHRCVA first started endorsing candidates in 1988.

This year, PBCHRCVA continued to work diligently to identify LGBTQ-supportive residents and get them registered to vote. Record numbers of our supporters will be voting this year. Thanks go out to everyone who has helped us in this initiative.

 While PBCHRCVA always has conducted Vote-By-Mail campaigns, this year we redoubled our efforts because of the pandemic. We want our supporters to vote, but we do not want anyone to take any unnecessary risks. Now, more than ever, we want you to vote by mail. (In Palm Beach County, return postage for your ballot is prepaid!)

To sign up for Vote-By-Mail in Palm Beach County, please, click on the link pbcelections.org/Voters/Vote-By-Mail

Voting for the August 20 Primary Elections is now underway! 

For those of you who insist on voting in person, PBCHRC recommends early voting, which runs from Monday, August 3, 2020, through Sunday, August 16, 2020, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. For more information about early voting please use this link: pbcelections.org/Voters/Early-Voting

 In mid-July, PBCHRCVA completed our endorsement interviews. For more than 30 years, our candidates' interviews were conducted face-to-face. In April, we switched to Zoom.

Our endorsements are based on how office holders have voted on LGBTQ issues and how all candidates have supported the LGBTQ community.

Our goal is to elect public officials who will enact laws and policies that will benefit our community. Thanks to our efforts, it has long been illegal to discriminate against LGBTQ people with regard to employment, housing and public accommodations throughout Palm Beach County. Public school students throughout Palm Beach County are protected from bullying and harassment based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Lesbian and gay couples throughout Palm Beach County, regardless of whether they are married, are entitled to many of the same benefits as other families. Moreover, conversion therapy for minors is prohibited throughout Palm Beach County. In fact, there are now more than 140 local ordinances, resolutions, collective bargaining agreements, and policies which provide Palm Beach County's LGBTQ+ residents and visitors equal rights, protections and benefits. A complete list can be found on the "Our Impact" (pbchrc.org/our-impact) on our website - PBCHRC.org.

To date, we have made the following endorsements for 2020.

President
Joe Biden

U.S. Congress (Dist. 18)
Pam Keith

U.S. Congress (Dist. 20)
Alcee Hastings

U.S. Congress (Dist. 21)
Lois Frankel

U.S. Congress (Dist. 22) Ted Deutch

Florida Senate (Dist. 25)
Reinaldo Diaz

Florida Senate (Dist. 29)
ina Polsky

Florida Senate (Dist. 31)
Lori Berman

Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 81)
Kelly Skidmore

Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 85)
Jim Carroll

Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 86)
Matt Whilhite

Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 87)
David Silvers

Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 88)
Omari Hardy 

Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 89) James Bonfiglio

Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 90)
Joe Casello 

Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 91)
Emily Slosberg

Constitutional Tax Collector
Anne Gannon

Sheriff
Ric Bradshaw

Supervisor of Election
Wendy Sartory Link

Palm Beach County Commission (Dist. 1)
Karen Marcus

Palm Beach County Commission (Dist. 3)
Dave Kerner

Palm Beach County Commission (Dist. 5)
Maria Sachs

Palm Beach County Commission (Dist. 7)
Mack Bernard

School Board (Dist. 1)
Barbara McQuinn

School Board (Dist 2)
Alexandira Ayala

School Board (Dist. 5)
Frank Barbieri, Jr.

Port Commission (Group 1)
Wayne Richards

Port Commission (Group 2)
Katherine Waldron

Port Commission (Group 3)
Clarence Williams, III

Circuit Court Judge (Group 16)
Jeffrey Dana Gillen

Circuit Court Judge (Group 30)
CO-ENDORSEMENT 
You may only vote for one of the following: 
Jamie Goodman, Adam Myron, OR Caryn Siperstein

County Court Judge (Group 12)
Debra Moses Stephens

Palm Beach Soil and Water Conservation (Group 4)
Rob Long

Following the August 18 Primary elections, additional endorsements may be made. For a complete list of the candidates endorsed by the PBCHRC Voters Alliance - including those who have already been elected this year - can be found by clicking on the Voters Alliance" tab on the PBCHRC website. (pbchrc.org/voters-alliance).

Whether you vote by mail, vote early, or cast your ballot on August 18, PBCHRC is counting on you to participate in the upcoming primary election. We trust that as the result of your efforts, members of Palm Beach County's LGBTQ community and our allies will vote in record numbers.


 "PALM BEACH COUNTY: YOU'RE WELCOME!" CAMPAIGN 

Although Florida has more than 400 municipalities, only 30 have ever enacted LGBTQ-inclusive civil rights ordinances. Therefore, in 2015, PBCHRC launched the "Palm Beach County: You're Welcome!" campaign to encourage municipalities in Palm Beach County to enact LGBTQ-inclusive civil rights laws. Over the years, municipal civil rights ordinances have been enacted in Boynton Beach, Boca Raton, Delray Beach, Greenacres, Lake Worth Beach, Ocean Ridge, West Palm Beach, and Wellington.

On June 11, the City of Westlake became the first municipality in Florida to enact a civil rights ordinance virtually. Thanks go out to Westlake Vice Mayor Katrina Long-Robinson for taking the lead on the initiative. The ordinance was enacted by unanimous vote.

Thanks to the efforts of Councilmember Darryl Aubrey, a civil rights ordinance was passed unanimously on First Reading in the Village of North Palm Beach. The ordinance will take effect immediately after Final Reading on August 13.

On that same date, the Haverhill Town Council hopefully will hold First Reading on a civil rights ordinance. Openly gay Town Council Member Ray Carancy is leading the effort in Haverhill. Later in August, the Town of Juno Beach is expected to consider their civil rights ordinance.

 PBCHRC also has asked the cities of Palm Beach Gardens and Riviera Beach, the Town Lake Park, and the Village of Palm Springs to consider enacting LGBTQ-inclusive civil rights ordinances before year's end.


PBCHRC CHARITABLE FOUNDATION 

The PBCHRC Charitable Foundation was established to fund scholarships and other charitable endeavors. In June, G. Joseph Garcia was named chair of the organization. He will be working closely with Jasmin Lewis who heads the Foundation's Social Justice Awards Committee. She succeeds Carly Cass, who developed and has directed the Daniel S. Hall Social Justice Awards program since its inception.

The Social Justice Awards are named after longtime PBCHRC treasurer Dan Hall, a local attorney who manages a financial counseling company. As the father of three grown children, Dan always has had a strong interest in education. Over the years, has mentored several LGBTQ students.

In June, the Charitable Foundation awarded Daniel S. Hall Social Justice Awards to Park Vista Community High School graduate Endora Guillaume and Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts graduates Kyle Ahern and Theo Shusterman. Each received a $2,500 scholarship in recognition of their advocacy on behalf of the LGBTQ community.

 On the date the U.S. Supreme Court issued its landmark opinion in Bostock v. Clayton County Georgia, Congressman Mark Foley contributed $10,000 to the Charitable Foundation to fund the 2021 Daniel S. Hall Social Justice Awards. Mark's donation was made "in appreciation of the years of labor on legislative policy that has led to this day of fairness and equality - and for Dan Hall's incredible leadership in helming the treasury of PBCHRC for the past 30 years."

The PBCHRC Charitable Foundation Board of Directors thanks Congressman Foley for his continuing support of the Foundation's scholarship programs.


CONVERSION THERAPY BAN COURT CHALLENGES 

 Liberty Counsel, an anti-LGBTQ hate group, filed suit in federal court on behalf of two therapists seeking to nullify the bans on conversion therapy for minors enacted by Palm Beach County and the City of Boca Raton. The lawsuit is virtually identical to one Liberty Counsel filed against the City of Tampa.

 Last year, Judge Robin Rosenberg of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida denied Liberty Counsel's motion for preliminary injunctions which sought to prevent the bans from remaining in effect pending trial. As a result, at least for the time being, young LGBTQ people in Palm Beach County will remain safe from the psychological abuse caused by conversion therapy. Having lost, Liberty Counsel has appealed the order to the U.S. District Court of Appeal for the Eleventh Circuit.

In February, I attended oral argument in federal court in Miami. The three judges who presided over the case include two judges appointed by President Trump and one appointed by President Obama. We await a ruling later this year.

In the Tampa case, things did not go well for LGBTQ children living in Tampa. Federal Judge William Jung, who was appointed by President Trump, struck down the city's conversion therapy ban. Having lost, the City of Tampa appealed the ruling to the U.S. District Court of Appeal for the Eleventh Circuit. Oral argument is set for the week of Novemner 16, 2020 in Jacksonville.


SUMMER SOIRÉE AND WINTER FÊTE 

In 1990, PBCHRC held a "Lawn Party"at the home of David Miller and Ray Wakefield. Public officials attending the event included Congressman Harry Johnston, County Commissioner Carol Roberts and Lois Frankel, who at the time served in the Florida Legislature. Over the years, the event morphed into our biennial Summer Soirée -- an opportunity for PBCHRC supporters, public officials and candidates to socialize and schmooze.

Unfortunately, for obvious reasons, there will be no 2020 Summer Soirée. However, we still need to raise money to keep PBCHRC moving forward. So, we are optimistically working on plans to host our next Winter Fête - at a spacious outdoor location - on Saturday, January 23, 2021.

 CONGRATULATIONS 


  • Ellen Baker has been elected to the Board of the Northern Palm Beach County Improvement District 
  • PBCHRC Board Member Jasmin Lewis has been named named a 2021 Victory Fund Endowment Fellow and was elected a Delegate to the 2020 Democratic National Convention. 
  • PBCHRC Board Member G. Joseph Garcia has been elected chair of the PBCHRC Charitable Foundation. 
  • Boynton Beach City Commissioners unanimously voted to designate all single-occupancy restrooms in the newly opened City Hall Complex as "All Gender". Thanks go out to openly gay City Commissioner Ty Penserga, who brought PBCHRC's request for the "All Gender" restrooms before the City Commission.


CURRENT INITIATIVES 

In June, PBCHRC asked Palm Beach County Commissioners and West Palm Beach City Commissioners to amend their ordinances protecting women and minorities from discrimination by expanding coverage to employees working for small businesses - those with between five and 14 employees. On June 27, West Palm Beach City Commissioners unanimously voted on First Reading to do so. The amendment is set to take effect August 10, following Final Reading on the amendment. County Commissioner Gregg Weiss is leading the effort to amend the county law, which we expect to be done before year's end.

PBCHRC Board Members Jasmin Lewis and Tamara Singer continue their work with the Palm Beach County Multicultural Committee and Complete Count Committee to help ensure all LGBTQ+ residents of Palm Beach County are included in the census.

Some of our other projects include persuading:


  • the City of West Palm Beach to install at least one LGBTQ Pride rainbow crosswalk, 
  • the School District of Palm Beach County to cease doing business with Chick-fil-A and other companies that discriminate against LGBTQ people and other minorities, 
  • the Health Care District of Palm Beach County to provide trans-specific healthcare services to indigent patients, and 
  • the State of Florida to prohibit discrimination based on "sexual orientation" and "gender identity or expression" and ban conversion therapy statewide. 

On a closing note, PBCHRC mourns the recent passing of Tom Gerrard, one of five openly LGBTQ people who served as mayor of a Palm Beach County municipality, Tom, a Republican, seved on the Manalapan Town Council and became Mayor in 2008. He was an advisor and a major donor for PBCHRC and many other LGBTQ-supportive organizations. I will always remember our 2009 trip to Tallahassee to meet with Republican legislators and key lobbyists about the LGBT-inclusive civil rights law introduced by then-state legislators Ted Deutch and Kelly Skidmore at the request of PBCHRC. There is also a great story on how he most effectively dealt with anti-gay neighbor. Ask me about it some time. Rest in Peace, Tom.

For more than three decades, the Palm Beach County Human Rights Council has worked diligently on behalf of the LGBTQ community. With your support, we will continue to do so in the years to come. As always, we will keep you posted on our progress.

Stay safe and keep healthy.

Judge Rand Hoch (retired),
President and Founder

This paid electioneering communication, which is independent of any party, candidate or committee, is produced, sponsored and paid for by the Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance. The Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance, P.O. Box 267, West Palm Beach, Florida 33402.

Thursday, July 30, 2020

PBCHRC Board Member Chauncey Graham selected for Leadership Florida Connect

The Palm Beach County Human Rights Council (PBCHRC), Florida's oldest, independent, non-partisan, all volunteer, political organization dedicated to ending discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity or expression, is proud to announce that Board Member Chauncey Graham has been selected for Leadership Florida Connect for 2020-2021.

Leadership Florida Connect, a nine month institute limited to professionals between the ages of 25 and 39, is Florida's only leadership program which spans industry boundaries and focuses on developing Florida's leaders.

Graham, a Florida native, graduated from the Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts (Music Performance) and earned his Bachelor's Degree from Florida Atlantic University, where he studied history and political science. He is Senior Director of Outreach and Community Engagement for the Florida Sugar Cane League (FSCL), a coalition of farmers and agriculture professionals whose mission is to connect Palm Beach County's diverse population to its agricultural history. Prior to his work for FSCL, Chauncey worked as a key staffer to members of the Florida Senate and Florida House of Representative for more than a decade.

Graham represents PBCHRC on the Palm Beach Sheriff's Office LGBT Liaison Unit. In addition, he is a founding member of the Board of Directors of the PBCHRC Charitable Foundation.

"Chauncey's innate leadership skills are clearly evident," said PBCHRC President and Founder Rand Hoch who recruited him to serve on the organization's board of directors. "What impresses me most is Chauncey's eagerness to develop those leadership skills through training and mentorship."

Graham was a 2018 Fellow of New Leaders Council Palm Beach and a graduate of Leadership Central Palm Beach in 2019.

He also volunteers as a program mentor for Take Stock in Children and chairs the Civic Engagement and Advocacy Committee of the Urban League of Palm Beach County's Young Professionals Network.

Graduates of Leadership Florida programs serve as chief executive officers of some of Florida's top corporations, elected officials, executives of non-profit organizations, and leading academicians. Some are farmers, managers of high-tech consortiums, rural hospital administrators, law enforcement officers, and key staff members of Florida governmental agencies.

Monday, July 27, 2020

West Palm Beach to Stengthen Equal Opportunity Ordinance


West Palm Beach City Hall Complex

(West Palm Beach, Florida) At tonight's meeting, West Palm Beach City Commissioners unanimously voted to amend the city's Equal Opportunity Ordinance by extending protection from discrimination to employees working for small businesses.

The vote was taken at the request of the Palm Beach County Human Rights Council (PBCHRC), Florida's oldest, independent, non-partisan, political organization dedicated to ending discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity or expression. Over the past three decades, PBCHRC has been responsible for the implementation of more than 140 laws and policies providing equal protections, rights and benefits for the LGBTQ community.

Currently, under both the West Palm Beach Equal Opportunity Ordinance and the Palm Beach County Equal Employment Ordinance, only employees working for businesses with 15 or more employees are protected from discrimination based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity or expression, genetic information, sexual orientation, disability, marital status, familial status or age. 

When the amendment approved tonight by the West Palm Beach City Commission takes effect following a final vote August 10, employees working for small businesses in West Palm Beach - those with between 5 and 14 employees - also will be protected.

"Tonight, in a unified show of support, West Palm Beach City Commissioners took another step to protect women and minorities from discrimination in employment," said PBCHRC President and Founder Rand Hoch. "West Palm Beach has been in the forefront of protecting workers from discrimination for decades."

The West Palm Beach Equal Opportunity Ordinance is not 
only one the state's most comprehensive civil rights ordinances, it also is the only civil rights law in Florida to soundly withstand a repeal effort.

Because the 1994 Equal Opportunity Ordinance protected gays and lesbians from discrimination, the Christian Coalition gathered a sufficient number signatures to force a referendum election in an attempt to repeal ordinance. However, after an ugly campaign, their efforts backfired. On January 10, 1995, West Palm Beach voters turned out in record numbers and resoundingly voted to keep the gay rights law in effect.

PBCHRC also has asked the Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners to amend the Palm Beach County Equal Employment Ordinance to protect employees working for small employers throughout the county

Thursday, July 23, 2020

PBCHRC Board Member Jasmin Lewis Named Victory Fund Empowerment Fellow

The Palm Beach County Human Rights Council (PBCHRC) is proud to announce that Board Member Jasmin Lewis has been selected by the LGBTQ Victory Institute to be a 2020 Victory Empowerment Fellow.  PBCHRC is Florida's oldest, independent, non-partisan, political organization dedicated to ending discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity or expression.

LGBTQ Victory Institute works to increase the number of LGBTQ people in public office and to provide programming, service and other support to help ensure their success. Victory Empowerment Fellows, LGBTQ leaders of color and trans leaders, are on the front lines of the fight for equality and justice in their communities. While dozens of LGBTQ activists from across the country applied for the coveted fellowships, only eight were selected. All are all LGBTQ change-makers with aspirations for public service.

Each of the eight 2020 Victory Empowerment Fellows will be assigned an LGBTQ mentor and  will participate in the Victory Institute's Candidate & Campaign Virtual Training. In December, they will attend the International LGBTQ Leaders Conference in Washington, D.C. The annual conference is the largest gathering of LGBTQ leaders in the world

"I was filled with emotion at being named a Victory Empowerment Fellow," said Lewis. "The mentorship, networking and skills this program provides will be invaluable in my work to improve the current landscape of inequality across Florida - as well as when I ultimately run for public office."

"Victory Empowerment Fellows bring critical voices to their communities.  They represent the future of LGBTQ politics," said PBCHRC President and Founder Rand Hoch. "Everyone on our Board of Directors is proud that Jasmin was recognized for her leadership and skills. We look forward to her utilizing the skills she will gain through the LGBTQ Victory Institute in her civic endeavors for many years to come."]

Jasmin holds a bachelor of science (B.S.) degree in Elementary Education, a master's degree in Elementary Education (M.Ed.), an Educational Specialist (Ed.S) degree in Educational Leadership and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership and Innovation. An English teacher at Palm Beach Gardens Community High School, Jasmin serves as a co-sponsor of the school's Gay Straight Alliance - the largest GSA in Palm Beach County

Throughout this election year, Jasmin has helped coordinate the PBCHRC Voters Alliance interviews of dozens of candidates for municipal, county, judicial and legislative office. PBCHRC Charitable Foundation named her as Chair of the Daniel S. Hall Social Justice Awards program.  She serves as the Community Engagement Co-Chair for the South Florida Steering Committee of the Washington, D.C.-based Human Rights Campaign (HRC) and as PBCHRC's liaison for HRC South Florida.

Additionally, Jasmin is involved in programs for the NAACP, the Urban League and Discover the Palm Beaches and serves on that organization's LGBTQ Advisory Board. As an Executive Board Member for New Leaders Council-Palm Beach, she serves as one of the recruitment chairs. Jasmin also is a member of the South Florida Fair's "Beyond the Fair - Class of 2021" and recently was elected Delegate to the 2020 Democratic National Convention.

Tuesday, July 14, 2020

PBCHRC Voters Alliance Endorsements - August 18 Primary Elections

The Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance endorses candidates who support LGBTQ initiatives and privacy rights. Endorsements of candidates are made upon consideration of: 

  • How a candidate has voted on LGBTQ issues 
  • How a candidate has supported the Palm Beach County LGBTQ community
The following candidates, some of whom will appear on your August 20, 2020 ballot, have been endorsed by The Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance for election or re-election in 2020.  (PBCHRCVA has not made endorsements in every race and not all of the listed candidates will appear on your August 18, 2020 ballot.) 

U.S. Congress (Dist. 18)
Pam Keith
U.S. Congress (Dist. 20)
Alcee Hastings  
U.S. Congress (Dist. 21)
Lois Frankel 

Florida Senate (Dist. 25)
Reinaldo Diaz
Florida Senate (Dist. 29)
Tina Polsky

Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 81)
Kelly Skidmore
Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 88)
Omari Hardy

Sheriff
Ric Bradshaw

Supervisor of Elections 
Wendy Sartory Link

Palm Beach County Commission (Dist. 1) 
Karen Marcus

School Board Member (Dist. 1)
Barbara McQuinn
School Board Member (Dist. 2)
Alexandira Ayala
School Board Member (Dist. 5)
Frank Barbieri, Jr.

Port Commissioner (Group 2)
Katherine Waldron
Port Commissioner (Group 3) 
Clarence Williams, III

Circuit Court Judge (Group 16) 
Jeffrey Dana Gillen

Circuit Court Judge (Group 30)
CO-ENDORSEMENT 
You may only vote for one of the following: 
Jamie Goodman
Adam Myron, or 
Caryn Siperstein

County Court Judge (Group 12)
Debra Moses Stephens

This paid electioneering communication, which is independent of any party, candidate or committee, is produced, sponsored and paid for by the Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance.
The Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance.
Post Office Box 267
West Palm Beach, Florida 33402

Saturday, June 27, 2020

Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance Endorsements - 2020 - Updated July 11, 2020

The Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance endorses candidates who support LGBTQ initiatives and privacy rights.


Endorsements of candidates are made upon consideration of: 

  • How a candidate has voted on LGBTQ issues 
  • How a candidate has supported the Palm Beach County LGBTQ community

The following candidates have been endorsed by The Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance for election or re-election in 2020:
President - Joe Biden
U.S. Congress (Dist. 18) - Pam Keith
U.S. Congress (Dist. 20) - Alcee Hastings  
U.S. Congress (Dist. 21) - Lois Frankel 
U.S. Congress (Dist. 22) - Ted Deutch  
Florida Senate (Dist. 25) - Reinaldo Diaz
Florida Senate (Dist. 29) - Tina Polsky
Florida Senate (Dist. 31) - Lori Berman
Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 81) - Kelly Skidmore
Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 85) - Jim Carroll
Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 86) - Matt Whilhite
Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 87) - David Silvers
Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 88) - Omari Hardy
Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 89) - James Bonfiglio 
Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 90) - Joe Casello 
Florida House of Representatives (Dist. 91) - Emily Slosberg
Tax Collector - Anne Gannon
Sheriff - Ric Bradshaw
Supervisor of Election - Wendy Sartory Link
Palm Beach County Commission (Dist. 1) - Karen Marcus
Palm Beach County Commission (Dist. 3) - Dave Kerner
Palm Beach County Commission (Dist. 5) - Maria Sachs
Palm Beach County Commission (Dist. 7) - Mack Bernard
School Board Member (Dist. 1) - Barbara McQuinn
School Board Member (Dist 2) - Alexandira Ayala
School Board Member (Dist. 5) -  Frank Barbieri
Port Commissioner (Group 1) - Wayne Richards
Port Commissioner (Group 2) - Katherine Waldron
Port Commissioner (Group 3) - Clarence Williams, III
Circuit Court Judge (Group 16) - Jeffrey Dana Gillen
Circuit Court Judge (Group 30) - CO-ENDORSEMENT 
    You may only vote for one of the following
    Jamie Goodman, Adam Myron, OR Caryn Siperstein
County Court Judge (Group 12) Debra Moses Stephens
Palm Beach Soil and Water Conservation Supervisor (Group 4) - Rob Long
Northern PBC Improvement District (Seat 4) - Ellen Baker
The following elected officials endorsed by The Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance currently hold office:

U.S. Congressman Ted Deutch
U.S. Congresswoman Lois Frankel
U.S. Congressman Alcee Hastings

Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services Nikki Fried


State Senator Lori Berman

State Senator Bobby Powell
State Senator Kevin Rader

State Representative Joe Casello

State Representative Al Jacquet
State Representative Tina Polsky
State Representative David Silvers
State Representative Emily Slosberg
State Representative Matt Willhite

County Commissioner Mary Lou Berger

County Commissioner Mack Bernard
County Commissioner Dave Kerner
County Commissioner Melissa McKinlay
County Commissioner Hal Valeche
County Commissioner Gregg Weiss
County Commissioner Robert S. Weinroth

Clerk of the Circuit Court Sharon Bock

Constitutional Tax Collector Anne Gannon
Property Appraiser Dorothy Jacks
Public Defender Carey Haughwout
Sheriff Ric Bradshaw
State Attorney Dave Aronberg

School Board Member Marcia Andrews

School Board Member Frank Barbieri
School Board Member Karen Brill
School Board Member Barbara McQuinn
School Board Member Debra Robinson
School Board Member Chuck Shaw
School Board Member Erica Whitfield

Port Commissioner Joseph Anderson

Port Commissioner Blair Ciklin
Port Commissioner Jean Enright
Port Commissioner Wayne Richards
Port Commissioner Katherine Waldron

Circuit Court Judge Jaimie Goodman

Circuit Court Judge Dina Keever-Agrama
Circuit Court Judge James Martz
Circuit Court Judge Lisa Small

County Court Judge Ted Booras

County Court Judge Marni Bryson
County Court Judge  Frank Castor
County Court Judge Edward Garrison
County Court Judge Ashley Zuckerman

Palm Beach Soil and Water Conservation Supervisor Rob Long

Palm Beach Soil and Water Conservation Supervisor Michelle Sylvester
Palm Beach Soil and Water Conservation Supervisor Eva Webb

Boca Raton City Mayor Scott Singer

Boca Raton City Council Member Monica Mayotte

Boynton Beach Mayor Steven Grant

Boynton Beach City Commissioner Justin Katz
Boynton Beach City Commissioner Ty Penserga
Boynton Beach City Commissioner Christina Romelus
Boynton Beach City Commissioner Woodrow Hay

Delray Beach City Commissioner Adam Frankel

Delray Beach City Commissioner Shirley Johnson

Greenacres City Councilwoman Paula Bousquet

Greenacres City Councilwoman Judith Dugo
Greenacres City Councilman Jonathan Pearce

Haverhill Town Council Member Ray Caranci

Lake Worth Beach Mayor Pam Triolo
Lake Worth Beach City Commissioner Andy Amoroso
Lake Worth Beach City Commissioner Omari Hardy
Lake Worth Beach City Commissioner Scott Maxwell
Lake Worth Beach City Commissioner Herman Robinson

North Palm Beach City Council Member Darryl Aubrey


Palm Beach Town Councilwoman Julie Araskog

Palm Beach Town Councilman Lew Crampton
Palm Beach Town Councilwoman Danielle Hickox Moore

Palm Beach Gardens City Councilmember Rachelle Litt Palm Beach Gardens City Councilmember Mark Marciano

Palm Beach Gardens City Councilmember Chelsea Reed

Riviera Beach City Councilwoman KaShamba Miller-Anderson


Royal Palm Beach Village Mayor Fred Pinto

Royal Palm Beach Village Councilwoman Selena Samois

Wellington Village Councilman John McGovern

Wellington Village Councilman Michael Napoleone
Wellington Village Councilwoman Tanya Siskind

West Palm Beach City Commissioner Christina Lambert

West Palm Beach City Commissioner Cory Neering
West Palm Beach City Commissioner Kelly Shoaf

This paid electioneering communication, which is independent of any party, candidate or committee, is produced, sponsored and paid for by the Palm Beach County Human Rights Council Voters Alliance.

Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Palm Beach Post: Advocates celebrate Supreme Court’s LGBTQ ruling

By Wayne Washington
June 16, 2020
Monday’s civil rights ruling was a game-changer, said retired judge Rand Hoch, founder of the Palm Beach County Human Rights Council.
Civil rights advocates and political officials in Palm Beach County hailed Monday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling that employers can’t fire workers because of their sexual orientation or their gender identity.
The 6-3 ruling, issued during Pride Month, is seen as a major step forward for gay, lesbian and transgender workers, who, before Monday, could legally get married on one day - and get fired because of their sexual orientation or gender identity the next.
“Justice,” U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Boca Raton, tweeted after the ruling was issued. “The freedom to marry. The freedom to work. The freedom to be LGBTQ. Happy Pride Month.”
Gaby Guadalupe of the ACLU Foundation of Florida said: “At a moment when we are witnessing so much injustice in the world, today we celebrate this court decision that clarifies for the first time that LGBTQ people are protected from employment discrimination from coast to coast, including in states and cities that have no express protection for LGBTQ people in their own laws.”
Some state and local governments, including ones in Palm Beach County, had already prohibited employers from firing workers because of their sexual orientation or their gender identity.
About 60% of Florida’s population, including the state’s biggest cities, have enacted local ordinances that ban discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Floridians at work, in housing, restaurants, hotels and other public accommodations.
Still, efforts to enact a state law that would accomplish the same goal have been frustrated annually at the state Capitol, where conservative Republicans have held control for more than 20 years.
Advocates, though, said Monday’s ruling is focused on banning discrimination in the workplace. Federal and state laws are still needed to expand civil rights laws to bar discrimination against LGBTQ people in housing, restaurants, hotels, health care and other areas.
“We still need Florida to pass comprehensive... sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination protections,” said Jon Davidson, attorney for Freedom for All Americans, an LGBTQ advocacy organization.
While advocates say more needs to be done, Monday’s ruling was a game-changer, said retired judge Rand Hoch, founder of the Palm Beach County Human Rights Council, which publicly advocates for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer rights.
“No longer will an LGBTQ worker’s rights be determined by their zip code,” Hoch said.
For Hoch and other advocates, the ruling was a long time in coming.
“Today’s Supreme Court ruling is colossal,” Hoch said. “I have waited 46 years for this day to arrive.”
The ruling, stemming from a case in Georgia, highlighted the sweeping change in public acceptance of - indeed, its demand for - LGBTQ rights.
Pride rallies, including one held this past weekend in New York, have produced massive, diverse crowds. Liberal politicians, celebrities and some businesses make clear their support for LGBTQ rights.
But many evangelical Christians oppose LGBTQ rights, and their opposition has been embraced by conservative Republicans, including those in the Trump administration.
The court’s ruling centered on an interpretation of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination “because of sex.”
Justices had to determine if that phrasing included sexual orientation and gender identity.
A trio of dissenters - Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas and Brett Kavanaugh - argued that Congress did not mean to include lesbian, gay, transgender, bisexual or queer people when they debated and passed the law.
“The Court tries to convince readers that it is merely enforcing the terms of the statute, but that is preposterous,” Alito wrote. “Even as understood today, the concept of discrimination because of ‘sex’ is different from discrimination because of ‘sexual orientation’ or ‘gender identity.’”
Six justices, including conservatives Neil Gorsuch and Chief Justice John Roberts, disagreed.
“Today, we must decide whether an employer can fire someone simply for being homosexual or transgender,” Gorsuch wrote for the majority. “The answer is clear. An employer who fires an individual for being homosexual or transgender fires that person for traits or actions it would not have questioned in members of a different sex. Sex plays a necessary and undisguisable role in the decision, exactly what Title VII forbids.”
Gorsuch was President Trump’s first Supreme Court nominee, and his decision to side with the court’s liberals added to the stunning nature of the ruling.
Trump’s authority to nominate conservative judges - and the prospect that they would issue rulings opposing business and environmental regulations, abortion rights and LGBTQ rights - has been a fundamental aspect of traditional Republican support for Trump, who was initially viewed warily by many in the party.
But Supreme Court justices with lifetime appointments don’t always rule the way their supporters want or expect, a fact Trump and conservative Republicans were reminded of with Monday’s decision.
Judicial Watch, a conservative activist group, said the Supreme Court “undermined the rule of law today.”
“In expanding the ban of sex discrimination in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to include sexual orientation and gender identity, the court engaged in an abuse of power by legislating from the bench,” the group said in a statement. “There has been a years-long battle by left to change federal law to bar discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. But the Supreme Court today short-circuited the democratic process and rewrote the law without a vote of Congress but by a vote of six unelected judges.”
U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel, D-West Palm Beach, said the ruling was about extending workplace protections to LGBTQ Americans that have been enjoyed by other citizens.
“No one should live in fear of losing their job because of who they love or who they are,” Frankel said.
USA TODAY-Florida Network Capital Bureau staff writer John Kennedy contributed to this report.